DANGERS

GENERAL INFORMATION & DANGERS

https://youtu.be/ECqknIEdqyE

What are opioids?

Prescription narcotics (“opioid”) is a category of commonly-prescribed painkillers. Doctors prescribe them, typically in pill form, to help patients with severe or chronic pain. When they’re taken as directed by a medical professional, they’re relatively safe and can be beneficial. But there is always a risk of addiction. And that risk increases greatly when you misuse prescription painkillers.

What is prescription painkiller misuse?

  • Taking prescription painkillers in a way that was not prescribed, such as taking too many pills at one time, combining pills with alcohol or other drugs, or crushing pills into powder to snort or inject them.
  • Taking someone else’s prescription painkiller, even if you’re doing so for the medication’s intended purpose, to ease pain.
  • Taking prescription painkillers for the sole purpose of feeling good or getting high.

Repeated misuse and abuse of narcotics– prescription painkillers – can lead to addiction and even death.

Who is at risk for addiction?

People who misuse or abuse prescription painkillers have a greater risk of addiction than people who take them as prescribed – but it’s important to remember that the medication itself is addictive. Even someone who takes opioids (narcotics) as prescribed by a doctor can develop a physical dependence on the drug, especially if prescribed for several weeks or more.

When someone who has become dependent on a prescription opioid painkiller stops using it, they will likely experience withdrawal symptoms including restlessness, difficulty concentrating, anxiety, anger, depression, muscle or bone pain, nausea and more. Therefore, the risk of addiction should be weighed against the benefits of the medication and any concerns should be discussed with your doctor.

What are the dangers of prescription painkillers?

Taking just one dose too large can cause serious health problems and potentially lead to death. Here’s a dose of reality: Deaths from unintended drug overdoses have been rising sharply in recent years. In 2015, there were more than 15,000 deaths involving prescription opioids (an increase of 443 deaths since 2014), equivalent to about 42 deaths per day (CDC, https://www.cdc.gov/drugoverdose/data/analysis.html).  Remember, the risk of overdose and death increases exponentially when prescription painkillers are combined with other drugs or alcohol.

Common Prescription Opioid (Narcotic) Painkillers

Oxycodone Brand Names: OxyContin®, Percodan®, Percocet®
Hydrocodone Brand Names: Vicodin®, Lortab®, Lorcet®
Diphenoxylate Brand Names: Lomotil®
Morphine Brand Names: Kadian®, Avinza®, MS Contin®
Codeine Various Brand Names
Fentanyl Brand Name: Duragesic®
Propoxyphene Brand Name: Darvon®
Hydromorphone Brand Name: Dilaudid®
Meperidine Brand Name: Demerol®
Methadone Various Brand Names

Addiction affects people from all walks of life.

Intervention by A & E is currently featuring an in-depth study of Georgia’s “Heroin Triangle,” highlighting the horrific effects of opioid abuse. Many of the individuals started off abusing prescription opioids which led them to heroin addiction.

Out of Reach from AAOMS.org on Vimeo.



DEA NARCOTICS


DRUG FACT SHEET

Heroin addiction is the same medical disease as opioid addiction. Repeated use of heroin or other opioids changes the way the brain operates. These changes cause cravings, impaired reasoning and withdrawal symptoms. Rehab that includes residential care, opioid medications, counseling and a variety of support systems is usually necessary for recovery from heroin addiction.

 

LEARN MORE – CLICK HERE 


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